“Bookmarked” Entries

The magic rule of seven

Computers are smarter than people. Don't use long lists of multiple choice when a simple fill in the blank will suffice. This is why asking for my state in a pull down list is inane. Just let me type in the two letters. (Hint: that's why Google works. It's fill in the blank, not multiple choice). Seth Godin

The magic rule of seven

Computers are smarter than people. Don't use long lists of multiple choice when a simple fill in the blank will suffice. This is why asking for my state in a pull down list is inane. Just let me type in the two letters. (Hint: that's why Google works. It's fill in the blank, not multiple choice). Seth Godin

On inspiration, by Jonathan Christopher

Jonathan Christoper has written an excellent article today, entitled Inspiration is something to have and to hold. Here are a few things that jumped out to me while reading it.

Look in new places

There’s plenty of inspiration flooding the Web at any given time. Whether it’s a design article from the people you look up to, or something you randomly stumbled upon, it’s almost trivial to find a new article that gets you thinking about Web design in a slightly different way.

Later he continues with:

Actively ignore the junk, because there’s lots

Quit looking at “CSS” design galleries. Seriously. Take other designs for what they’re worth, but unless you want to get away with blending in and at the same time do nothing for your personal growth, peruse them in your free time, not to jump start your creative. I do feel there can be inspiration gathered from these sites, but little more than checking out what trends and novelties have filtered through the entire spectrum of Web designers.

Along those lines: push the linkbait, “Top 13″, design trend, monetary-inspired articles as far away as possible. Those pieces exist for little more than click-through percentage boosts and hitting the front page of Digg. What good is that to you? There’s a very fine line between information and linkbait, and it’s very important that you’re critical of everything you read. In my opinion, there’s quite a bit of junk out there, all backed by a lot of “leading” design sources. That’s not the place to find inspiration.

Finding inspiration can be tough. I love the idea of getting offline to find your inspiration. Have a notebook with you. Jot down notes, thoughts, pieces of information—anything that inspires you. With the web, specifically, you have to have a filter—the ability to block out the noise—and find real value.

On inspiration, by Jonathan Christopher

Jonathan Christoper has written an excellent article today, entitled Inspiration is something to have and to hold. Here are a few things that jumped out to me while reading it.

Look in new places

There’s plenty of inspiration flooding the Web at any given time. Whether it’s a design article from the people you look up to, or something you randomly stumbled upon, it’s almost trivial to find a new article that gets you thinking about Web design in a slightly different way.

Later he continues with:

Actively ignore the junk, because there’s lots

Quit looking at “CSS” design galleries. Seriously. Take other designs for what they’re worth, but unless you want to get away with blending in and at the same time do nothing for your personal growth, peruse them in your free time, not to jump start your creative. I do feel there can be inspiration gathered from these sites, but little more than checking out what trends and novelties have filtered through the entire spectrum of Web designers.

Along those lines: push the linkbait, “Top 13″, design trend, monetary-inspired articles as far away as possible. Those pieces exist for little more than click-through percentage boosts and hitting the front page of Digg. What good is that to you? There’s a very fine line between information and linkbait, and it’s very important that you’re critical of everything you read. In my opinion, there’s quite a bit of junk out there, all backed by a lot of “leading” design sources. That’s not the place to find inspiration.

Finding inspiration can be tough. I love the idea of getting offline to find your inspiration. Have a notebook with you. Jot down notes, thoughts, pieces of information—anything that inspires you. With the web, specifically, you have to have a filter—the ability to block out the noise—and find real value.

Seth Godin: The right someone

You don't want everyone. You want the right someone. Seth Godin

Seth Godin: The right someone

You don't want everyone. You want the right someone. Seth Godin

Robert Hoekman Jr.: The Myth of Usability Testing

I am a little tardy to reading a recent A List Apart article by Robert Hoekman, Jr., entitled The Myth of Usability Testing.

One specific sentence that caught my eye was:

Page views and time-spent-per-page metrics, while often foolishly considered standard measures of site effectiveness, are meaningless until they are considered in context of the goals of the pages being visited.

Too many times we get caught up with the tools—first—without understanding the people using those tools.

He finishes up with this:

Test for the right reasons and you stand a good chance of achieving a positive outcome. Test for the wrong ones, however, and you may not only produce misleading results, but also put your entire business at risk.

Robert Hoekman Jr.: The Myth of Usability Testing

I am a little tardy to reading a recent A List Apart article by Robert Hoekman, Jr., entitled The Myth of Usability Testing.

One specific sentence that caught my eye was:

Page views and time-spent-per-page metrics, while often foolishly considered standard measures of site effectiveness, are meaningless until they are considered in context of the goals of the pages being visited.

Too many times we get caught up with the tools—first—without understanding the people using those tools.

He finishes up with this:

Test for the right reasons and you stand a good chance of achieving a positive outcome. Test for the wrong ones, however, and you may not only produce misleading results, but also put your entire business at risk.

Jason Fried: When's the last time you read your site out loud?

When’s the last time you read your site or web app aloud? Not just the big text blocks and the about page, but the headlines, field labels, buttons, error messages, and confirmation emails? —Jason Fried

This can be a truly humbling experience. It's also interesting to watch other people read your website out loud while they try and interact with it.

Jason Fried: When's the last time you read your site out loud?

When’s the last time you read your site or web app aloud? Not just the big text blocks and the about page, but the headlines, field labels, buttons, error messages, and confirmation emails? —Jason Fried

This can be a truly humbling experience. It's also interesting to watch other people read your website out loud while they try and interact with it.

A better solution for multiple select

asmSelect is a jQuery plugin that answers some of these issues. A progressive enhancement is applied to the select multiple that makes it much easier to use. This enhancement automatically hides the original select multiple, and instead presents a regular select showing the available options, and an HTML list showing the already-selected options. While hidden, the original select multiple is updated as the user makes changes. (via)

I haven't played around with it too much, but it looks to be promising. I definitely think it is an advantage over the multiple select option.

Featured Reflect Site: Sushi & Robots

Over on the Reflect website, we are starting to feature websites being built using the CMS. The first of our showcased sites is from our good friend Jina Bolton. She recently launched a new website, Sushi & Robots that is sitting on top of our Reflect CMS. Congrats to Jina! The site looks great, and thank you for all of your great work, valuable feedback, and patience.

This entry was written on August 20th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with reflect, clearfunction, portfolio, and jinabolton

How to be a successful journalist with no prior experience

This is an excellent article in response to this fine journalistic piece. You know, the one that states:

All you need to know is that a block of HTML -- essentially, a bunch of gobbledygook words and symbols -- can add extra features to your site. And numerous third-party sites offer handy HTML blocks you can plug into your site, as easily as copying and pasting text in Microsoft Word.

Absolutely brilliant!

Seth Godin: Old marketing with new tools

We tend to use new tools to do less. We try to save time and money at the same time, and end up depersonalizing and commodifying what we do. (via)

This entry was written on August 13th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with sethgodin

Conditional CSS

The first thing that comes to my mind when I see things like this is: is CSS really that hard? I don't say that in a condescending way, but does it really need to run through a PHP (or C) processor, adding unnecessary overhead? I think it is good for some systems to output the CSS based on variables in their backend CMS or storage system, but it should be cached as to not require parsing with each request. In this instance, the CSS doesn't change based on variables coming from a backend system, it only changes based on the browser requesting it.

I can slightly understand the need for @variables inside of CSS, but I just don't get the point of adding a middleman parser to do things like this. Am I interpreting it wrong?

This entry was written on August 13th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with css, html, and conditionalcss

Validating forms in Campaign Monitor

Campaign Monitor has posted a tutorial today on Making Certain Fields Required

You can see I've added class="required" to the text fields I want to make compulsory, and class="email required" in the case of the email address. I've also added an onsubmit parameter to the form tag, which will run our validation function when the submit button is clicked.

The example shows how to add JavaScript validation to your form fields from Campaign Monitor. A good tutorial, inspired by DOM Scripting. My only question is, they make it a point to use CSS classes for their hooks, yet add an inline onsubmit to handle the validation itself? Wouldn't it have been easier to wrap it all into one unobtrusive package?

Snook: Don't Bring Me Down

Jonathan Snook recently posted an article entitled Don't Bring Me Down which brings up discussion points related to properly archiving content between re-designs. While I would agree with him for the most part, I appreciated a comment by Bryan Veloso where he states:

[...] People blog differently, people feel different magnitudes of attachment to either blog posts or search engine rankings. Me? I don't give a crap about where I'm placed. I don't blog to get ranked, I blog because I happen to like doing it. If my ranking goes down because I nuke my posts, hypothetically, then I'll go boo-hoo for a day, but that's it. (via)

I have always been an advocate for businesses building websites to be sure to keep their content properly linked up, even if things are shifted around. Moving content isn't the main issue at hand for them, it's about putting the proper redirects in place so that their content is not lost. On personal sites, however, much of that can change.

My blog has been a personal playground for me in many aspects. When I reflect back on the things I wrote when I initially started this blog, I fail to see any value in what I wrote then. At that point I was just writing to fill the blog up with content, then I began to search for my voice, my reason for blogging at all. So in that aspect, I see nothing wrong with purging older posts that contain very little (or no) value. I may end up with some broken links. I may end up with some broken bookmarks (doubtful with some of the posts, he). At the end of the day, it isn't entirely about the search engines. It's about personal values, personal and professional goals, and quality content. There is a difference between a personal designer blog and a business in it to profit from one avenue or another (advertising, services, products, etc).

One thing that I come across often through reading books: broken links to examples on the web. Many times designers or developers will point to their colleague's blogs or other sites as examples of what they are trying to show. It can be frustrating trying to maintain offline bookmarks such as these, but I do think it's important to weight it in when you are thinking about removing content all together.

Not every piece of content will be meant to be sticky. There are some posts, like this one, that are opinion pieces or responses to things taking place elsewhere on the web. In fact, this message will self destruct in 10 days. Will it be missed?

Seth Godin: The secret of the web

The media wants overnight successes (so they have someone to tear down). Ignore them. Ignore the early adopter critics that never have enough to play with. Ignore your investors that want proven tactics and predictable instant results. Listen instead to your real customers, to your vision and make something for the long haul. Because that's how long it's going to take, guys. (via)

This entry was written on August 11th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with sethgodin, workprocess, applicationdevelopment, and burnout

Entrepreneurship advice from Marc Hedlund, CEO of Wesabe

Most importantly: ignore every other source of “feedback” — competitors, reviewers, two-bit commentators, whatever. If what these other sources have to say matters, you’ll hear it from your market directly. If you don’t, what the other sources say is irrelevant. (via)

This entry was written on August 11th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with applicationdevelopment, professional, process, passion, marketing, workfromhome, and workprocess

Get the hell out of the house

See, as a creative professional, getting out of the house and into the world is crucial component to supporting, enriching, inspiring and informing your art. Here’s why: [...] (via)

Seth Godin: Is architect a verb?

In light of yesterday's discussion on the title of a designer, Seth Godin has an interesting post today that shows a move from designer to architect.

Architecture, for me anyway, involves intention, game theory, systems thinking and relentless testing and improvement. Fine with me if you want to call it design, just don't forget to do it. (via)

Jason Santa Maria: Explain Yourself

The catchall term “designer” works for some, but I hate the generality. It’s the difference between an “appliance” and a “kitchen appliance”, the latter has an implied duty and place. I don’t design furniture, and I don’t decorate living rooms, I specifically work with type and image to communicate. Unfortunately, the term “communication designer” is practically unknown outside the industry, leaving most people to wonder just what it is you design for the phone company. (via)

I've really been enjoying his posts since his shift in design. I personally like the design of this discussion, so be sure to check it out in context, not just your feed reader. And be sure to check out some of the previous discussions and layouts.

This entry was written on August 6th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with designer, roles, webdesigner, and webdeveloper

The 5 hidden costs of running a CMS

Many think of a content management system as a magic bullet that solves all of their content woes. Unfortunately the cost of a CMS is greater than its price tag. Before making a decision about whether to adopt a CMS, or indeed which CMS to choose, you first need to be aware of the hidden costs. These include:

  1. The cost of training
  2. The cost to quality
  3. The cost to functionality
  4. The cost of redundancy and flexibility
  5. The cost of commitment

It is important that you understand the impact of each beginning with the cost of training. (via)

Paul Boag recently wrote this article on Vitamin about the 5 Hidden Costs of Running a CMS. I think his article was very well put together and a good resource for those currently shopping for a CMS.

When it comes to a CMS there is no bulletproof solution. Take some time to do the research to make sure the CMS will fit your business goals and needs. As a developer behind Reflect CMS, I fully believe that Reflect will not fit the needs of everyone. While I am very passionate about the work we have put into making it a great CMS option, we are realistic in knowing we won't be able to please everybody. Do yourself a favor and do the research when you are shopping. Ask yourself the questions that Paul lists in his article. If time allows, get in and play around with the different systems. Don't settle for something that won't fit your needs, and don't try and shoehorn your needs into a system that wasn't designed to handle those needs (Yes, I am looking at you, Wordpress).

This entry was written on August 6th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with cms, reflect, vitamin, and boagworld

Complicit

Why does spam exist? Because (some) people respond to it. Why are ineffective pharmaceuticals so heavily marketed? Because (some) people demand that doctors prescribe them. Why are so many local stores struggling? Because so many customers cross the street to the big box stores. (via)

Passionates

In other words, the task is not always to make people passionate about something, it’s to show them how technology (or your product, etc) can make them even better at what they’re passionate about. (via)

This entry was written on August 6th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with passion and professional

Does higher education produce web professionalism?

I can attribute nearly all of my technical knowledge to the Web community. There are so many authors providing a better education than any university could, and they’re doing it for free. (via)

This entry was written on August 5th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with passion and professional

Avoid

Avoid comparison shoppers.

Because they’re probably buying on price, not value. (via)

Jay Fields: Civics not Cadillacs

The analogy probably breaks down quickly, but the same basic idea applies to business software. Time after time I see developers delivering Cadillacs when Civics would have been acceptable. The business has no idea what the difference in cost is between a Civic and a Cadillac so, as any ignorant customer does, they smile, thank you, and walk away worrying that they got screwed. (via)

This entry was written on July 31st, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with programming, applicationdevelopment, and workprocess

Unmatched Style Interview with Jina Bolton

What makes one a web design professional?

If you make websites for money, you could possibly say you’re a web design professional. However, I know I wouldn’t want to get surgery from a guy who just decided to become a doctor, but hasn’t had any training. I’m not saying you have to go to school to become a web design professional. Experience and research can be everything you need. But if you’ve just picked it up as a hobby, and don’t put the serious time into learning the “right way” to do things, and don’t read up on web standards, then I’ll be honest in saying I will have a hard time believing that you’re a web design professional. (via)

Well said, Jina. Be sure to check out the rest of the interview with Jina as she discusses her passion for such things as typography, user experience, and interface design.

This entry was written on July 30th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with interviews and jinabolton

What you expect from clients is what you will get

Instead of looking down at your clients, look for ways to convince, educate, and guide them. That’s part of your job. (via)

This entry was written on July 30th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with 37signals, development, education, and webprofession

Clear Function: New websites for Grace Church and Woodlands Church

We [Clear Function] recently launched a couple of websites for Grace Church, located in Memphis, TN and Woodlands Church, located in Plover, WI. Both of these websites are using Reflect and are two more great examples of what is possible when using Reflect. […] (via)

This entry was written on July 28th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with reflect, clearfunction, and portfolio

50 useful tools for evaluating your website

I received a friendly email yesterday with this informative link entitled Is your site hot or not? 50 useful tools for evaluating your website, and thought it would be worth sharing. The tools found in this list are helpful in many aspects of developing, testing, and analyzing on the web. While these tools may not be new to everyone, it's nice to have them compiled in a central location that is easy to break down by category and listing.

Thanks for the resource and the link, Kelly.

This entry was written on July 24th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with resources, tools, and development

Blue Flavor: How we decide what to charge you

The folks at Blue Flavor give us a glimpse on their process for charging clients. It was a bold move to make it public, but one I am glad they did. They have nothing to hide and are open about their work and their process. Over the past few weeks they have given great insight into their process, and it has been great to get a glimpse into Blue Flavor.

This entry was written on July 24th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with blueflavor, process, and estimation

Silverback app has launched

Clearleft’s first desktop application is now available! Silverback is a handy piece of software to make ‘guerilla’ usability testing a breeze. Running on Mac os x Tiger or Leopard, Silverback records mouse movements and keystrokes, and uses your Mac’s built-in microphone to record the usability test moderator and tester’s commentary. (via)

This entry was written on July 24th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with usability, clearleft, and silverbackapp

Are they ready to listen?

"The tragic mistake of demographics and media planning is that they overlook the single most important issue: is the person you're talking to ready to listen?" (via)

Take these same thoughts and apply them to web advertising. I know that I have a filter for advertising, but every now and then, something catches my eye. This usually happens when I am ready to listen. When I am looking for good prices on hardware, software, or a book. For those that do online advertising, do you test your placement? How about your message? How about the medium (text vs. images)? Just some food for thought.

This entry was written on July 22nd, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with advertising and marketing

How to use status to style a list

As computer programmers we often get stuck thinking in binary. Things are either true or false, black or white, on or off, good or bad, pass or fail. Although computers think this way, the people who use the software typically do not. We can use our skills as human beings to create a better user experience for our customers. (via)

This entry was written on July 21st, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with designinginteractive, ui, and interactiondesign

The web doesn't care

The question to ask is, "how are people (the people I need to reach, interact with and tell stories to) going to use this new power and how can I help them achieve their goals?" (via)

This entry was written on July 21st, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with sethgodin

Some thoughts on scalability

If a service doesn't scale it is more likely due to bad design than to technology choice. Remember that. (via)

This entry was written on July 16th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked and Programming. It was tagged with scalability

New website for CoNotes.com

Clear Function recently launched a new website for CoNotes.com, the online destination to discover and learn about job opportunities in fast-growth and startup companies. It was a pleasure working with Andrew Chen of CoNotes and to be involved in what we hope will prove to be a great resource for job seekers.

For those of you who saw the official release earlier, this one includes a second phase built around social features allowing you to search jobs, bookmark jobs, add favorite companies, communicate with other members, and more.

Walking the line when you work from home

Working from home is a balancing act, to be sure. But pre-planning, negotiation, flexibility, perseverance—and, of course, quiet time—are all you need to successfully walk the blurry line between work and home. (via)

Excellent article, Natalie!

This entry was written on July 15th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with workfromhome, homeoffice, and freelance

The real world value of proper web development

"[...] So... how many potential clients / employers that YOU work for actually care about the quality of what's being built for them? And what do you feel the perceived value of a quality frontend developer is these days? Does our expertise really MATTER? (via)

This entry was written on July 14th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with professional, webdevelopment, and webstandards

Eyeballs are overrated

Eyeballs are overrated.

See, it’s not about HOW MANY eyeballs you capture; it’s WHOSE eyeballs you capture, ask Seth Godin taught me.

Because all the traffic in the world doesn’t do you any good (except for maybe a temporary ego boost) … unless it actually converts into something worthwhile. (via)

This entry was written on July 10th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with traffic, seo, and analytics

Fighting the traffic race

Why not get into the traffic race? Because I’d rather be in the race for a smart, focused audience. That’s where the real action is.

This entry was written on July 3rd, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with traffic, stats, analytics, and scoble

Early retirement is a false idol

Why does the idea of work have to be so bad that you want to sacrifice year’s worth of prime living to get away from it forever? The answer is that it doesn’t. Finding something you to love to work on seems to be a much more fruitful pursuit than trying to get away from the notion of work altogether.

This entry was written on July 3rd, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with 37signals, passion, work, and retirement

Why we need another CMS

The last week or so I’ve been beta testing Reflect. Nate Klaiber and our friends at ClearFunction have hit the nail on the head with their hosted CMS solution. It’s light, agile and flexible. You can build your own website in a few minutes or have a professional designer put the look and feel together for you. It’s competitively priced and offers a few well thought out features [...]

Reflect recently went into private beta and we have already received some great feedback from many of the users. Thanks to Josh Walsh and Dave Goerlich from Designing Interactive for their kind words.

If you haven't heard of Reflect and are interested, you can check out the official Reflect website where you can sign up for the mailing list to receive updates and invitation to the private beta.

On a side note, I recently had a chance to meet up with Josh and Dave and check out their new upcoming app, Simpli5. If you are tired of e-commerce sites that do everything under the sun, but don't do what you need - sign up for their mailing list to get more information. I was blown away by the interface and R&D that they have put into building this application.

This entry was written on July 3rd, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with reflect, joshwalsh, designinginteractive, and davegoerlich

Cornerstone Subversion client for OSX

"Take control of Subversion with a client application that was specifically designed for Mac users. Cornerstone integrates all of the features you need to interact with your repository and does so in an elegant and easy-to-use fashion." (via)

I have been testing out Versions over the past week and have really enjoyed this. I was recommended Cornerstone via my friend Brad Dielman and had to check it out. So far it looks fabulous.

This entry was written on July 3rd, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with svn, subversion, braddielman, cornerstone, and versions

Revyver refreshes

These sites are simply beautiful. Great work Bryan!

This entry was written on July 1st, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with design, revyver, and inspiration

Google and Yahoo peek inside flash with help from Adobe

"[...] Adobe has been working to make Flash more index-able by search engines. Google has recently rolled out better code for Flash, e.g. you’re now more likely to see useful snippets on Flash pages in Google’s search results." (via).

While I think this is a good step, I think there are many other aspects to be considered with Flash. Search engines being able to see inside Flash still doesn't solve browser related issues, nor does it index contextually as your page with actual HTML markup would. Content areas inside of flash have no organization like a raw HTML page. How will search engines index keywords as more important than others? These are big factors to SEO performance and it will be interesting to see how they are handled (maybe this is already in the works?).

Here is an example of results in Google, appropriately marked as FLASH. However, browsing through a few random pages of those results shows that the text that they see inside of the flash file looks like gibberish. There is no structure.

This entry was written on July 1st, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with flash, seo, adobe, google, and yahoo

My interview on Godbit.com

I recently had a chance to answer a few questions for Nathan Smith of Godbit, and he has posted the interview. Thanks for your patience, Nathan.

This entry was written on June 29th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with godbit, nathansmith, interview, and sonspring

XSS security flaw in Basecamp

"Basecamp intentionally allows HTML (and JavaScript) because many of our users find great value in being able to use that. We’re full aware that this allows for XSS attacks, but Basecamp is based on the notion of trusted parties. You should only allow people into the system that you believe won’t hack your system (just as you should only invite people into your office that you don’t believe will steal from you).

If this was a public system, it would definitely be different. You can’t have a public forum today without carefully dealing with XSS issues."

This is a response from Sarah Hatter in response to the discovery of an XSS vulnerability in Basecamp. I like her response, in conjunction with DHH who states:

"If your friend becomes a foe, you can revoke their account and change your login credentials. Just like you would simply not let them into your office.

In the 3+ years we’ve operated Basecamp, we’ve never had a single such case occur, though. So it doesn’t seem like it’s a big problem. And I know many of our customers would scream murder if we removed the option to use HTML in their messages, as they’ve become accustomed to over the past 3+ years."

This is part of their Getting Real approach to things, and, while I am normally strict when it comes to security aspects, this makes perfect sense.

This entry was written on June 26th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with basecamp, xss, and security

The employable web designer

"A Web designer who cannot craft quality, functional Web pages is a liability and unprepared for the profession." (via). Great article by Andy Rutledge packed with great advice to the aspiring web designer. This is not just from a making things pretty perspective, he touches all bases from design, business and marketing. While sounding harsh in some areas, I think he hits the nail on the head.

This entry was written on June 26th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with andyrutledge, designview, professional, and webdesigner

Removing Microformats from bbc.co.uk/programmes

"[...] Until these issues are resolved the BBC semantic markup standards have been updated to prevent the use of non-human-readable text in abbreviations." (via)

This entry was written on June 23rd, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with microformats, html, and semantics

Why HTML

"The short and sweet reason is simply this: XHTML offers no compelling advantage — to me — over HTML, but even if it did it would also offer increased complexity and uncertainty that make it unappealing to me." (via)

I share the same reasoning as to why I prefer HTML to XHTML. No need to argue it, really, it's a personal preference and I will never use the supposed advantages. I already have other tools to do those jobs with plain HTML.

This entry was written on June 18th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with html and xhtml

Interview with Jonathan Snook

Subvert interviews solo developer Jonathan Snook.

This entry was written on June 16th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with snook, jonathansnook, interviews, and subvertmarketing

Eric Meyer on CSS content generation

"If it’s important, it should be in the content. It shouldn’t be generated." (via)

This entry was written on June 10th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with ericmeyer, css, contentgeneration, and quotations

A note about process

"So long as the end user finds value in what we build, it doesn’t matter. My process is my process. Yours is yours. Lets talk, but leave the heavies at the door please." Amen, Colly. (via)

This entry was written on June 6th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with collylogic, simoncollison, html, javascript, css, and workprocess

KISSing is for the experienced

"Trying to apply KISS when getting into a new technology is STUPID. Writing the most succinct and simple code is only possible if you know all nuances of what you are working with. Otherwise your simplicity will be based on wrong assumptions and lead to buggy code." (via)

This entry was written on May 15th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with felix, thinkingphp, debuggable, php, kiss, and programming

Twitter said to be abandoning Rails

"But let’s be real for one minute. Twitter doesn’t suck because of Rails. Twitter sucks because they have ridiculous amounts of traffic (especially to their API and SMS gateways), a limited ability to cache (a non-realtime Twitter is a pretty useless Twitter), and (as far as I can tell), they’re not making any money, so they probably have limited resources to pour into more hardware." (via)

Well said, Jeff. Even if you do want to see them use Django.

This entry was written on May 15th, 2008. It was filed under Bookmarked. It was tagged with jeffcroft, twitter, rails, ruby, rubyonrails, scaling, sms, and api